{"_id":"550dc2d35b757f0d00f14132","user":{"_id":"5507846643d3400d0052fd09","username":"","name":"Byron Ruth"},"initVersion":{"_id":"5509d0dae463aa3d000dd351","version":"0.9"},"tags":[],"__v":0,"project":"55078477fa89210d00c8ca23","createdAt":"2015-03-21T19:13:23.491Z","changelog":[],"body":"Time is a nebulous concept.\n\nWhen it comes to day-to-day life for humans, time is an axiom that we follow and adhere our schedules to. For humans, it is easy to synchronize time. We look at our watches (or phones) and can generally agree what time it is within some small and *acceptable* amount of error.\n\nA logical extension to this acceptance of discrepancies is our ability to learn information \"out-of-order\", such as learning about past events in history class. When these events are learned, we unconsciously add them to two dimensions of time. One being the learned time (I just learned this information two minutes ago) and the application time (this event occurred during the Civil War). Likewise this information can be recalled by two methods, \"what did you learn in the past 10 minutes?\" and \"what events occurred during the Civil War?\".\n\nThis method of learning is required to live in a concurrent world. Events are happening all around us and our minds and bodies take in this information and adapt accordingly. Under normal circumstances it is never the case that minds *forget* what we once learned. Our memory may elude us, but the information is stored somewhere that is able to be retrieved given the right set of conditions.\n\nOrigins and other bitemporal systems natively support these two dimensions of time. *Transaction time*, referred to above as learned time, is the time the information is available. *Valid time*, referred to above as applicable time, is the time the information is true in the world. The same two questions mentioned above can be asked to retrieve the information.\n\nWhat did you learn in the past 10 minutes? (added to the Civil War domain)\n\n```\norigins history civil-war --asof=10m\n```\n\nWhat events occurred during the Civil War?\n\n```\norigins events civil-war\n```\n\nThe two dimensions of time can be combined to observe how information changes over time. In the example below, the learned events in the last 10 minutes would not be included even though later events during the Civil War may be present.\n\n```\norigins events civil-war --asof=11m\n```\n\nHaving access to these two dimensions of time provide a powerful insight to how data changes over time and observing when it actually impacts the real world.","slug":"understanding-time","title":"Understanding Time"}

Understanding Time


Time is a nebulous concept. When it comes to day-to-day life for humans, time is an axiom that we follow and adhere our schedules to. For humans, it is easy to synchronize time. We look at our watches (or phones) and can generally agree what time it is within some small and *acceptable* amount of error. A logical extension to this acceptance of discrepancies is our ability to learn information "out-of-order", such as learning about past events in history class. When these events are learned, we unconsciously add them to two dimensions of time. One being the learned time (I just learned this information two minutes ago) and the application time (this event occurred during the Civil War). Likewise this information can be recalled by two methods, "what did you learn in the past 10 minutes?" and "what events occurred during the Civil War?". This method of learning is required to live in a concurrent world. Events are happening all around us and our minds and bodies take in this information and adapt accordingly. Under normal circumstances it is never the case that minds *forget* what we once learned. Our memory may elude us, but the information is stored somewhere that is able to be retrieved given the right set of conditions. Origins and other bitemporal systems natively support these two dimensions of time. *Transaction time*, referred to above as learned time, is the time the information is available. *Valid time*, referred to above as applicable time, is the time the information is true in the world. The same two questions mentioned above can be asked to retrieve the information. What did you learn in the past 10 minutes? (added to the Civil War domain) ``` origins history civil-war --asof=10m ``` What events occurred during the Civil War? ``` origins events civil-war ``` The two dimensions of time can be combined to observe how information changes over time. In the example below, the learned events in the last 10 minutes would not be included even though later events during the Civil War may be present. ``` origins events civil-war --asof=11m ``` Having access to these two dimensions of time provide a powerful insight to how data changes over time and observing when it actually impacts the real world.